General Assembly

President’s Letter:

Delegates,

In most MUN conferences, the General Assembly is thought to be the weak link between the forums; where topics are too broad to be solved with even broader solutions presented by the delegates. However, that is not the case with KAMUN. As the President of the General Assembly, I prefer to think of it as the pivot from which the rest of the forums find their solutions. That is why we aim to produce detailed solutions for the world’s pressing issues, thus helping other forums with their solutions. The General Assembly can be as exiting as you want it to be. Therefore, come in prepared, and ready to breed original, unique solutions that could be debated for hours. It is not a contest between the delegates to whom provides the best solutions, as in the UN they do not do that, instead, they collaborate with one another for better solutions. Just remember, you can make your solutions unique in your own way. I cannot wait to see you soar in KAMUN 2017.

Best,

Osama Gedeon

President of the General Assembly

Osama Gedeon
President of the General Assembly

Email: osamagedeon18@kingsacademy.edu.jo

Phone Number: +962 7 9647 7661

Deputy President’s Letter:

Delegates,

Firstly, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Rafi Naber, and I am the Deputy President of the General Assembly for this year’s KAMUN conference. I refuse to describe my MUN experience by a conversation about how many conferences I’ve attended, despite them being large in number, and despite that conversation being the usual small talk in MUN, as I personally believe that the number of conferences you attend does not make you an intellectual delegate, but rather how you take advantage of those experiences to build and compliment your personal perspective on international politics and the art of debate. Contrary to popular belief, MUN debate is not a competition of who can take the podium the most amount of times, or who can ask the most points of information; it is about presenting the forum with a unique perspective on the issue at hand, which brings along the provision of creative, yet realistic solutions.  I wish you the best of luck, and I genuinely hope that you, the delegates of the General Assembly of KAMUN 2017, will be able to satisfy, and exceed my expectations.

Best,

Rafi Naber

Deputy President of the General Assembly

Rafi Naber
President of the General Assembly

Email: rafinaber18@kingsacademy.edu.jo

Phone Number: +962 7 9921 2775

Topic 1: Ensuring energy sustainability in the middle east through nuclear energy.

The idea of nuclear energy has become a very common one in the past decade or so. However, most Middle Eastern countries tend to be left out of the debate due to their lack of development. Nevertheless, Middle Eastern countries, such as Jordan, UAE, Kuwait and many others, have expressed their interest in nuclear energy and/or have started making deals and plans for implementing nuclear energy on their land. Therefore, due to the lack of any other concrete non-fossil fuel energy source and the proliferation threat that nuclear energy arises; we believethat the topic of nuclear energy in the Middle East would be a very debatable and controversial topic that invited many different perspectives on the matter.

Packet 1: link

Topic 2: Requesting a sustainable solution for the maritime disputes of the South China Sea.

During the past years, China has become the world’s second largest economy, and planted the seeds to a resilient military as well. To showcase its military and economic prowess, China has begun to aggressively assert its power and claim over much of the South China Sea. These actions have instigated a roar of terror from neighboring countries that also claim maritime territory; Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Indonesia, and Taiwan. Each of these countries has had a historical background to their territorial claims, and many of them backed with the rules of the UN itself. These countries are not just fighting over some gallons of seawater, the South China Sea may hold as much as 11 billion barrels of oil, within the next decade, 90% of Middle Eastern fossil fuel exports are expected to pass through the sea, and above all, $5.3 trillion of trade pass through the sea each year. This conflict not just a conflict of land, but it is also a military conflict, with historical precedence, over resources in order to bolster economic strength. A topic like this is worth debating in the General Assembly because of the multiple polarized lenses within it, and because of the multiple parties involved in the matter.

Packet 2: link

Topic 3: Preventing violence in disputes over shared borderland and oil reserves between Venezuela and Guyana.

For those of you who believe that the conflict between Venezuela and Guyana over the shared borderland and oil reserve seems unimportant, you are simply wrong. According to the Independent, the supposedly unimportant conflict “has nearly provoked a war between the US and Britain.” This not only shows the seriousness and legitimacy of the issue, but it also proves the urgency of solving this conflict before it causes other international wars and issues. In our current decade, the conflict between Venezuela and Guyana is basically based upon an area of land, known as the Essequibo, which is insisted to be owned by both countries. The sovereignty over this area is very controversial due to the fact that the Essequibo makes up about 60 percent of Guyana’s total area (see appendix one), and therefore if Guyana loses its rights over this area, it loses a very large part of its land. Not only that, but also, the Essequibo is manifested in many resources that can tremendously help the economies of the two countries. Nevertheless, despite the already existing tension over this area of land, new leads have emerged in May of 2015, consisting of the Guyanese government announcing that it has discovered an oil field in the Essequibo area, which was followed by Venezuelan threats and eventually the conflict of the two governments.

Packet 3: link